EADRA – Classification of EADs

It is important to recognise that cost sharing is different for each EAD category. Detailed information about the four categories of EADs can be found in the EADRA FAQs.

Click on each category to see a summary and diseases covered.

It is important to recognise that cost sharing is different for each EAD category. Detailed information about the four categories of EADs can be found in the EADRA FAQs.

Click on each category to see a summary and diseases covered.

EAD Category 1 - Cost sharing: Government 100%, Industry 0%

EADs that predominantly seriously affect human health and/or the environment (eg depletion of native fauna) but may only have minimal direct consequences for the livestock industries.

Diseases: Australian lyssaviruses (including bat lyssavirus); Equine encephalomyelitis (western, eastern and Venezuelan); Japanese encephalitis; Nipah virus; Rabies

EAD Category 2 - Cost sharing: Government 80%, Industry 20%

EADs that have the potential to cause major national socioeconomic consequences through very serious international trade losses, national market disruptions and very severe production losses in the livestock industries that are involved. Category 2 also includes diseases that may have slightly lower national socioeconomic consequences, but also have significant public health and/or environmental consequences.

Disease: avian influenza (highly pathogenic; virus subtypes H5 and H7); bovine spongiform encephalopathy; Brucella abortus; Brucella melitensis; foot-and-mouth disease; glanders; Hendra virus; peste des petits ruminants; Rift Valley fever; rinderpest; screw-worm fly; sheep and goat pox; vesicular stomatitis

EAD Category 3 - Cost sharing: Government 50%, Industry 50%

EADs that have the potential to cause significant (but generally moderate) national socioeconomic consequences through international trade losses, market disruptions involving two or more states and severe production losses to affected industries, but have minimal or no effect on human health or the environment.

Diseases: African horse sickness; African swine fever; Anthrax (major outbreaks); Avian influenza, highly pathogenic (not H5/H7) and low pathogenicity (H5/H7); Bluetongue (disease in sheep); Bovine tuberculosis; Classical swine fever; Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia; Encephalitides (tickborne); Lumpy skin disease; Menangle virus (porcine paramyxovirus); Newcastle disease; Scrapie; Small hive beetle; Swine vesicular disease; Trichinosis (trichinellosis); Vesicular exanthema

EAD Category 4 - Cost sharing: Government 20%, Industry 80%

Diseases that are mainly production loss diseases. While there may be international trade losses and local market disruptions, these would not be so great as to significantly affect the national economy. The main beneficiaries of a successful emergency response to an outbreak of such a disease would be the affected livestock industries.

Diseases: Aujeszky’s disease; Borna disease; bovine tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis; contagious equine metritis; dourine; east coast fever; epizootic lymphangitis; equine babesiosis; equine encephalosis; equine influenza; Getah virus; haemorrhagic septicaemia; heartwater; infectious bursal disease (hypervirulent form); Jembrana disease; Maedi-visna; Nairobi sheep disease; porcine epidemic diarrhoea; porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS); Potomac horse fever; pulmonary adenomatosis; sheep scab; surra; Influenza A virus of swine; Teschen disease; transmissible gastroenteritis; Wesselsbron disease